Assessment Materials in Maths for Economists

Peter Schuhmann, University of North Carolina, Wilmington; Michelle Sheran, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Created and tested by a multi-institution consortium with funding from the US National Science Foundation, this site offers Economics students "Math you need, when you need it." Each topic has explanatory text with examples, plus self-test questions and an instructor page with learning objectives and further links. The site has an online assessment tool, iMath, which course leaders can use to conduct online tests. There are five topics as of Summer 2014, with many more in development.

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Mathcentre

MathCentre is a very large repository of tutorial videos, interactive assessments and PDF handouts to help with maths topics, roughly at A-level. This link is to a range of topics selected as relevant to Economics. The materials are categorised by area (such as Algebra, Arithmetic and Differentiation) and by individual topic.

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Fowad Murtaza, University of Essex, Domenico Tabasso, University of Essex

This course webpage supports an introductory module on quantitative economics as taught by Fowad Murtaza and Domenico Tabasso at the University of Essex in 2009/10. It introduces students to the methods of quantitative economics, i.e. to how data are used in economics. Beginning from an elementary level (assuming no background in statistics), the course shows how economic data can be described and analysed. The elements of probability and random variables are introduced in the context of economic applications. The probability theory enables an introduction to elementary statistical inference: parameter estimation, confidence intervals and hypothesis tests. With these foundations, students are then introduced to the linear regression model that forms a starting point for econometrics. It includes a course outline / handbook, lecture presentations, lecture notes, coursework assignments, problem sets with solutions and statistical data.

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Hilary Lamaison, Brunel University

Three short (15 minute) tests are archived here, using a cross between multiple-choice and multiple-response questions, totally 26 questions.

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Dieter Balkenborg, University of Exeter

Mathematics for economists is a course webpage produced by Dieter Balkenborg of the University of Exeter, the 2008 version of the course was taught by Juliette Stephenson. The material includes lecture slides, class exercises and solutions, homework tasks, and exam papers, usually made available as PDF files. Also includes links to previous versions of the course stretching back to 2001.

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Jerry Evensky, Syracuse University

This is an online multiple choice self-test to assess basic graph comprehension, including identifying positive and negative slope. It has 26 questions. Using Javascript, it should work on any modern web browser. The results include recommendations of online materials to review to fill identified gaps in the student's knowledge.

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Martin Poulter, Economics Network

This is an online tool that creates paper exams in the key mathematical skills required for Economics. It generates questions randomly, lets you choose which ones to include and then print out separate question and answer sheets.

Study skills for Economics students

Our site Studying Economics has tips including writing and referencing, revision, and help with maths.

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