Lecture Slides in Intermediate Microeconomics

K. K. Fung, University of Memphis

About two dozen short animated lectures and online slide shows for micro and macroeconomics. The slides are in a Flash format which does not allow editing, but allows readers to step through and recap. They use animation to build up graphs and show their interrelation.

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Kevin Hinde, University of Northumbria

This is the support site for a Microeconomics 2 course and has PDF lecture notes and PowerPoint animated slide shows for the following topics: Game Theory, Firms and Markets, Principal Agent Analysis, Production, Costs, Competition and Monopoly, Monopoly Pricing, Cournot Oligopoly, Stackelberg and Bertrand, Cournot with Conjectural Variations, and Price Leadership.

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Kevin Hinde, University of Northumbria

The economics of competition: a global perspective, is part of Kevin Hinde's suite of economics resources. The lecture slide shows are from a course for Business Studies students which "explores the effects of competitive and anti-competitive behaviour in Europe". Lecture topics are: Introduction to Competition and Regulation, Case Study on Regulation: Protecting Consumers, Understanding Markets and Industries, The Welfare Effects of Market Structure, Oligopoly, Barriers to Entry, Cartels, Predatory Behaviour, and Privatisation and Regulation of Public Utilities. They are available in PDF and also as PowerPoint files.

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Institute for Fiscal Studies

This section of the IFS website contains a good variety of free resources which could be useful for teaching.  There are online journal articles from their own Economic Review, Powerpoint slides of public lectures, quick factsheets and interactive resources, eg. "Income Distribution - where do you fit in?"  Topical areas covered include food prices, taxing the rich, understanding public sector finance and higher education funding.

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Margaret Bray, London School of Economics and Political Science

This complete set of materials for teaching income tax has been used in a second year undergraduate microeconomics course for economics specialists at the London School of Economics. The material could also be used in a public finance course. There are 107 Powerpoint slides, a worked example to support the lecture, a class activity involving student presentations (printable instructions for students and for lecturers) and some assessment questions.

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Xeni Dassiou, City University

Lecture notes on theory of the firm, growth of firms and industry concentration, barriers to entry, product differentiation, welfare effects of monopoly and other industrial topics. Some handwritten; most contain graphical presentation as well as algebra, some accompanied by slides. Linked to 10-week Industrial Economics course at City University, as taught in 2005.

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Marcos Vera-Hernandez, University College London

PowerPoint presentation depicting decision-making under risk, showing how risk attitudes can be examined using choices among lotteries or willingness to pay for insurances. Shows how risk attitudes can be captured in convexity of the indifference curve or strict concavity of the utility function; and how risk aversion can be quantified by the ratio of second and first derivatives of the utility function, implying that it falls as wealth increases.

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Marcos Vera-Hernandez, University College London

Archived page from a course taught in 2008. It contains 100+ lecture slides covering the demand and supply sides of partial equilibrium analysis, including effects of shifts in demand and supply, price elasticities of demand and supply, short- and long-run changes, efficiency and welfare analysis, impact of taxes and price controls, extension to international trade. Uses clear graphics and simple equations. Also includes a course syllabus, coursework assignments and a sample exam paper.

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Ian Wooton, Strathclyde University, Stewart Dunlop, Strathclyde University

This course webpage for Prices and Markets, as taught at Strathclyde University includes sets of lecture slides for the 2003/4 course in PDF, as well as problem sets (short answer and True/False) with answers in a separate file. There are also some sample questions from past exams. The site is no longer online so this link goes to the Web Archive's copy.

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Dieter Balkenborg, University of Exeter

This is a course webpage supporting a course on intermediate microeconomics as taught by Dieter Balkenborg at the University of Exeter in 2007/8. It includes a course outline / syllabus, slides and lecture notes, supplementary information on specific topics, exam papers and solutions. It also features a link to the 2006/7 version of the course. Most of the material is available as PDF files.

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Ed Dolan, Stockholm School of Economics

Ed Dolan teaches global macroeconomics, managerial economics, money and banking, and other courses in several European countries. His blog features short articles relating to economics teaching, including news, data, examples, and illustrations. Each post has a link to a free set of PowerPoint slides that can potentially be used in teaching.

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Vivek Chaudhri and Bob Marks, University of New South Wales

A dozen sets of bullet-point lecture slides from an MBA course in microeconomic analysis, with some past exercises. Topics are: Creating Value, Added Value in Trade, Monopolistic Markets, Costs of Production to Mass Markets, Pricing to Mass Markets, Pricing with Multiple Buyers and Sellers, Production in Perfectly Competitive Markets, Barriers to Entry and Competition, Game Theory Revisited, Oligopoly, and Review and Extensions to Business Strategy.

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