Video and Audio Lectures in Principles of Microeconomics

Department of Economics, University of South Africa

Hundreds of videos (mostly in English, but some in Afrikaans) on economic principles. Some are in chalk-and-talk format, while others use narrated animation. They are organised by topic into playlists. The most popular videos are the Keynesian multiplier, the IS-LM model, and absolute and comparative advantage.

Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY)
Office for National Statistics

A four-minute summary of wealth inequality in Great Britain, looking at the North/South divide, and showing some comparisons of the wealth of the wealthiest 10% against the bottom 50%.

Open Government Licence
Office for National Statistics

Short video summary of what unit labour costs are and how they are calculated, using narrated animation. "Next it looks at how unit labour costs have changed since the onset of the 2008/09 recession and what drivers have caused the changes. Lastly it looks at sectional unit labour costs across both the production and service sectors and how they have changed since the start of the recession".

Open Government Licence
K. K. Fung, University of Memphis

About two dozen short animated lectures and online slide shows for micro and macroeconomics. The slides are in a Flash format which does not allow editing, but allows readers to step through and recap. They use animation to build up graphs and show their interrelation.

Creative Commons Attribution ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA)
Jonathan Gruber, MIT

A complete online course, adapted from a course delivered on-campus at MIT in the Spring of 2011. It includes a set of lecture videos, assigned readings, problem sets with the solutions explained in videos, and an exam. The course assumes a high-school knowledge of calculus and covers the principles of consumer behaviour, firm behaviour, market structure and policy relevance.

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike (CC-BY-NC-SA)
Center for Economic and Policy Research

10 lectures by US economists downloadable as streamed video or MP3 audio presentations, with accompanying PowerPoint slides and related papers that pursue the issues in more depth. Two lectures are on growth (Dean Baker, Mark Weisbrot), others on US labour markets (John Schmitt), women in the labour market (Heather Boushey), trade (Mark Weisbrot), intergenerational mobility and life chances (Heather Boushey), the Federal Reserve, asset bubbles and intellectual property (all Dean Baker). The lectures are US-focused and reflect the sometimes market-critical perspective of the Center for Economic Policy and Research, a think-tank founded by Baker and Weisbrot in 1999 with an advisory board including Joseph Stiglitz and Robert Solow (not to be confused with the UK-based Centre for Economic Policy Research).

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial ShareAlike (CC-BY-NC-SA)
Mary McGlasson

This is a collection of short YouTube videos that use narrated drawings and graphs to introduce basic concepts including market structures, comparative advantage and elasticity of demand.

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial NoDerivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND)
Jason G. Welker, Zurich International School

Welker's Wikinomics is a set of online resources for teachers and students of International Baccalaureate Economics. The video resources include around 100 video tutorials of about ten minutes each, uploaded during 2012. They use a narrated-diagram format to explain concepts in basic micro-, macro- and international economics. Each category also has flashcards, a glossary and worksheets.

Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial NoDerivatives (CC-BY-NC-ND)
FreeVideoLectures

FreeVideoLectures brings together videos of economics courses from Universities such as Yale and Berkeley, as well as online providers like the Khan Academy. They are arranged by topics, including: international economics, trade, game theory, history of economic thought and economic demography. Items are listed by course enabling students to work through a course chronologically.

Mix of licences
Amos Witztum, London School of Economics and Political Science

Recorded September 2011, this lecture introduces distance learning and covers the motivations for studying a university course in Economics, including what can be learned about the subject from the 2008 financial crisis.

Standard YouTube Licence
K. K. Fung, University of Memphis

A series of YouTube animated videos explaining basic micro concepts such as prisoner's dilemma, public versus private goods, internal versus external costs, profit maximisation versus efficiency maximisation.

Standard YouTube Licence
Jacob Clifford

Clifford, an Advanced Placement Economics teacher based in California, uses YouTube to share many short videos of him explaining economic concepts, organised into playlists around micro and macro concepts. As of the start of 2012, his economics videos have had more than a million views. They are freely reusable for non-commerical purposes.

Standard YouTube Licence
Jodi Beggs, Northwestern University

This project includes more than one hundred YouTube videos aimed at introductory university-level economics, with a wide range of durations. Lecturer and columnist Beggs announces new videos and blog posts video through Facebook, Twitter, Google Plus and other platforms.

Standard YouTube Licence
Roger K. Strickland

The videos on this YouTube channel are extracted from lectures in economics and in Managerial Finance, including some made direct to camera. They are organised into playlists around different themes including "Macroeconomics - basic models" and "Linear Demand Elasticities". The lecturer is based in an unspecified US institution.

Standard YouTube Licence
Larry Arvan, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

This channel has more than fifty "Micro-lectures on Microeconomics", using spreadsheets and audio narration to explain topic in a few minutes. The spreadsheets themselves are downloadable from the video descriptions.

Standard YouTube Licence
Le Monde

Though this YouTube channel of well-produced, narrated illustrations is mostly in French, the linked playlist has several with English text and narration, on topics including "What is Comparative Advantage?", "How can a country go bankrupt?", and "How does bad news affect the economy?" and "What is the Budget Wall?" Content is approved by academic economists as well as by Le Monde.

Standard YouTube Licence
British Broadcasting Corporation

This archive of 20+-minute interviews includes some of economists, politicians and academics speaking on economic issues. They include former Chancellor Alastair Darling, Christine Lagarde of the IMF, Richard Thaler, and Statistician Nate Silver.

Standard YouTube Licence
Antony Davies, Duquesne University

An index of YouTube clips, mostly created by the author and colleagues, but with some from media sources. Typically about two minutes, they provide explanations of mainly microeconomic topics.

Standard YouTube Licence
PBS Now

Archived on this page are links to particular PBS NOW stories relating to economics. The links take to story pages that often include further links to video, transcripts, data and side stories. The archives go from 2002 to the present.

All Rights Reserved
YoungCuts Inc.

More than 150 educational videos on Consumer Behaviour, Producer Behaviour and Market Structures on a site which charges a yearly (or shorter) subscription for access to the videos.

All Rights Reserved
James Murray and John Nunley, University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

Dozens of "pencasts" (audio narrated pen animations) on introductory topics. The site requires Flash player.

All Rights Reserved

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