Threshold Concept Games Project

An Economics Network funded project, 2006-7, continued in 2007-8 and 2008-9

Project leader: Jon Guest
Contact: J.Guest@coventry.ac.uk

Threshold concepts are problematic and troublesome ways of understanding for the student. This maybe a particular problem in economics as people often behave in different way to that suggested by the rational choice model. This project has the following aims and objectives:

  1. Develop suitable classroom experiments and games.
  2. Test the impact of these classroom experiments on the understanding of selected threshold concepts.
  3. Develop teaching material on social preferences that could be easily adapted into microeconomic courses e.g. extending standard indifference curve analysis and developing pedagogic material on behavioural game theory.

Output: Case Study: Introducing Classroom Experiments into an Introductory Microeconomics Module

Continued in 2007-8 as: An Investigation into the Impact of Classroom Experiments on Student Learning in an Intermediate Microeconomics Module

The main purpose of this project is to introduce and evaluate the impact of classroom experiments on student learning in an intermediate microeconomics module at Coventry University. It will build on the experience gained by the researcher whilst carrying out a mini project last year. This initial project involved introducing classroom experiments onto an introductory microeconomics module.

Output: Case study: Introducing Games/Experiments into an Intermediate Microeconomics Module

Continued in 2008-9 as: The Relative Impact of Classroom Experiments on More Objective Measures of Student Learning

The main purpose of this project is to evaluate the impact of classroom experiments on student learning outcomes in an introductory microeconomics module at Coventry University. It will build on the experience gained by the researcher whilst carrying out successful teaching and learning projects over the last two years. The key development will be the focus on developing and using more objective measuring of student learning.

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